Tim the Blue Octopus By: Nick S. and Monica S.
Not so long ago, but somehow in the near future, in a reef not far from your home, there lived an octopus. This octopus was called Tim. He was bored of dwelling in his cave, and decided to go on a camping adventure to Camp Watermalondrea.

On his way to Camp Watermalondrea, he saw all kinds of life. A colony of sea turtles was having lunch at the Turtle Grass Café. They were enjoying their yummy turtle grass stir-fry until a gang of Eagle Rays showed up. The Eagle Rays began to attack and eat the peaceful sea turtles. Before Tim could witness the horror, he zoomed away behind a rock. “Enough of this”, he thought. “Onward to camp!”

Once again Tim was on the move. As he rounded the bend, he noticed a terrible thing. The coral were all white and lifeless. The Skeletal Eroding Band was in effect. It was slowly killing the coral from the inside. “How dreadful that the coral has to perish like this”, he said.

While traveling to his destination, he had to stop and wait for the Imperial Shrimp to pass by riding on his sea cucumber. Tim bowed down to the shrimp lord has he passed, and then he was on his way.

As he was on the final stretch of his journey to Camp Watermalondrea, he saw an amazing sight. Clancy the Clownfish was using his wonderful cleaning skills to clean his house, the sea anemone. The sea anemone’s tentacles waved to Tim as he squirted by. Tim waved back.

Finally came the sign that said Camp Watermalondrea, two hundred feet. He was so excited he accidentally inked. To his horror and surprise, he saw that the camp was deserted when he got there. “So disappointing…” he said. “I made this whole journey for nothing. Actually, I did get to learn about the cycles and relationships of the coral reef.”


The End
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Tim the Blue Octopus
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